Archive for Kwela

Mbaqanga

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on November 27, 2008 by micahsalkind

Mbaqanga, a cultural movement as well as an evolution in Black township pop, emerged from strains of Kwela and Marabi music in the Shebeen culture of 1950s and 1960s Johannesburg (specifically the vibrant, racially mixed neighborhood of Sophiatown). More vocals were incorporated into the Jazzy Afropop of Marabi, sung in Xhosa and Zulu as well as English. The movement birthed international stars such as Miriam Makeba, Dolly Rathebe, The Mahotella Queens and Letta Mbulu. The Mbaganga sound heavily influenced the 1980s Bubblegum sound.

Miriam Makeba – Pata Pata

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Marabi

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , on November 27, 2008 by micahsalkind

 

Marabi, a combination of African polyrhythms, is also the term used to describe the township Jazz of the early 20th century. Predecessor to Mbaqanga, Marabi is characterized by the cheep pedal organ and the influence of early American Jazz, Ragtime and Blues. Few musicians were recorded and the music was largely an underground phenomenon, but it laid the ground for later commercial Black music in South Africa and nurtured a class of professional Black musicians. It influenced such Cape Jazz artists as Abdullah Ibrahim and Basil Coetzee.

Abdullah Ibrahim – Next Stop Soweto

Kwela

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on November 27, 2008 by micahsalkind

Kwela, which evolved from repetitive South African Jazz known as Marabi, developed as a part of township and shebeen culture in the 1950s. It later evolved into the sound of Mbaqanga. The joyful, syrupy music was based around pennywhistle leads and featured guitar, bass and drums as well. Important artists include Spokes Mashiyane, Lemmy Mabaso and Willard Celes.

Spokes Mashiyane – Dolos